Author Archives: Frankie Wallace

About Frankie Wallace

Frankie earned her BA in History from CSU Chico. Her writing includes current events as well as self published fiction and a children's book she is publishing. She lives in northern California with one husband, two dogs, and three boys. Frankie is an avid cooker, reader, hiker, and napper.

Reprisal

Remember the story of Braveheart?

We cheered the Scottish leader and

praised the victory at Stirling but still

the story ended in failure for the Scots

and an ultimate, eternal loss of their independence.

 

Their own division was their downfall.

 

Clans fought among each other

instead of finding the common ground of

unity, each un-willing to let loose of smaller

ideals in order to coalesce against a tyrannical enemy.

 

The story we write today is commensurate.

 

A Party of factious clans mobilize around leaders

to whom we’ve pledged our souls without

understanding that such an action means

we’ve also turned our backs on one another.

 

We fail to realize we share the same intents.

 

Sure, I’ll validate your assertion that

policies and proclamations of one leader

outweighs those of another, but each has

their strength. They are none of them benign,

they are none of them blameless, either.

 

We only have this moment to keep our independence.

 

I pray we can all step back for a wider perception

and comprehend the task at hand: to

loosen the grip on our own sacred ideals

in order to make room for a much needed accord,

for the vitality of the Party,

for the sake of our nation.

 

Only with coherence does the US avoid a reprisal of Scotland’s subordination.

 


Shadow Moments

In the foggy veil of choice between open or closed,

Does your mind spark at the truth it sees through the mist?

Does it come alive for just a second

At the sight of real food after

subsisting on man-made, synthetic soundbites?

In those precious plancks of time is

your soul jolted out of its sleep

by the clarifying view of reality?

Would you recognize the desire

to marry the truth and

cherish its security?

Could you allow yourself

to consider shrugging off

the layers of dusty antiquity

in order to enjoy

the fresh air of reason?

Or…

Do you automatically snuff out that spark?

Do you consciously kill your appetite for truth?

Do you faithfully self-administer

another dose of opium?

Is that desire instantly deemed hideous?

Does the stale air of familiarity

enable you to keep the doors closed

to the cleansing breeze of truth?

In these shadow moments,

Where we decide what our soul

would accept or reject,

where we suspend time for a nanosecond

to ponder the foundations on which we

engineer our personal operations,

would you just once seize the light

and choose to live in truth instead?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Thinly Sliced

How tenuous your Democracy.

On the width of a piece of parchment, it hangs

Where the slow breeze of selfish breath

Chews away at its corners.

 

How brief your arc in the sky.

An idea formed from oppression for

An ideal of freedom and equality;

Lasted only a moment.

 

How thin the ties of your society.

Once more we pull and tug

Over truth and justice and integrity,

Untying knots of unity.

 

What slight margin secures the office?

Imagine! A measly few thousand votes

Strong enough to pry open

Heavy steel gates of tyranny.

 

How sadistic this treason?

Self-serving and super-sized;

Personal vendetta paid for by

International reputation.

 

Beg to pardon that hypocrisy.

The self-righteous pointing of the past

Comes round to claim its due.

Pray, mercy be granted.

 

Did you not vaccinate for this virus?

A mutant DNA of sequential lies,

Algorithmically curated;

Souls become deaf, and blind.

 

Words fly as short, dark arrows.

Facts distorted, maligned.

Dissident becomes the enemy.

Right will always find its mark.

 

Transformation finally complete.

A once dissected Octopus

Now an ugly Frankenstein of

Strange patch-work laws.

 

Deep groans a country.

Suffering from weight of avarice

bending the spine, then Snap!

From the strain of inequality.

 

What of you dutiful citizens?

Will you confess your indifference?

Recognize the facade of indestructibility

While you hastily mend the aspect.

 

Does not your heart break again,

And again and again and again?

To watch the speed of cancerous growth,

Knowing the cure is destructive as well.

 

How tenuous your democracy.

How brief your arc in the sky.

Does not your heart break again,

And again and again and again?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Twenty-First Century Treatise: The Law of Diversity

As I’ve asserted earlier, we are as subject to Nature’s Laws as every other living thing on earth, even our social structures are bound by them. Current events in the US and Europe, manifested in groups such aIdentity Evropa or Unite the Right, whose aims are to create a homogeneous culture of religion and race, provide the opportunity to examine the merits of whether homogeneity or diversity enhance our societies.

There is no doubt that Nature exhibits a strong preference for diversity over homogeneity in the physical realm. No two snowflakes are alike, no two human finger prints are alike, and even identical twins develop differences in their individual DNA despite their origins from the same fertilized egg.

Consider the ruling families of Europe of not-so-long-ago who intermarried frequently as a way to keep a homogeneous bloodline and consequently curated a small gene pool as a result. Smaller gene pools equate to less diversity giving recessive genes higher probabilities of expression. This explains the frequency of  hemophilia in several royal families. (Conversely, unhealthy dominant genes could not be diluted in smaller gene pools, such was the case with the Hapsburgs.) The present kingdom of Saudi Arabia is challenged with problematic health issues due to its tradition of intermarriage at all levels of society: 

“But research at hospitals and medical centers indicates that the rates of some metabolic diseases may be as much as 20 times higher among Saudi Arabia’s 14 million people than they are in populations where the gene pool is more widely mixed.

Blood disorders such as thalassemia, a hemoglobin deficiency and sickle cell anemia, as well as diabetes are widespread, particularly in some provinces with high intermarriage rates…”

Humans aren’t the only animals that suffer from a lack of diversity due to small gene pools. Our fascination with purebred dogs means that these canines come with more inherent health issues than their mixed breed counterparts. Race horse breeders understand the problems associated with a small, homogeneous gene pool, and “have done comparatively well in maintaining genetic diversity…”

On the physical level, diversity allows for healthier outcomes overall, while homogeneity guarantees some genetic complications in future generations. But does the  strength of diversity  transcend the physical realm to the societal realm? We can unequivocally conclude that social and cultural diversity have a direct, positive effect upon our nations and their economics.

For example, studies consistently demonstrate,that mixed groups produce better outcomes to challenges than homogeneous groups when applied to workplace creativity and vibrancy.

Though people often feel more comfortable with others like themselves, homogeneity can hamper the exchange of different ideas and stifle the intellectual workout that stems from disagreements. (Kellogg School of Management)

Distinguished University Professor, Richard Boyatzis explains the benefits of diversity this way:

Diversity initiatives can have important and interesting social justice benefits, but the real reason you want to pursue diversity programs is for innovation. You want diversity of thought…Differences in race, gender, and socioeconomic background are three characteristics, but so are differences in learning style or differences in professional field….If a group has an ability to create dialogue, diversity of thought helps them not get into groupthink. 

A recent, extensive study  reveals that countries benefit greatly on an economic scale thanks to the diversity that immigration provides. For instance, young migrants tend to make up a larger portion of a population than natives, this is a crucial detail,  “Migration will play an increasingly vital role in coping with this transition and easing the burden on care and social security systems.”

Another economic benefit of immigration, among many, is that migrants are employed in “jobs…often characterized as ‘household production’ services. The increased presence of immigrants in this sector has made home services more affordable, which in turn has allowed more native-born women — especially highly educated women — to join the labor force or to increase their hours worked.”(Berkeley).

A venture into the political realm allows us to easily identify the problems with a homogeneous political system as those are most commonly known as dictatorships or tyrannies – where one strand of thought is compulsive throughout a society and any opposition is silenced immediately. There is no freedom in these societies. Historically and currently, there are plenty of examples of these – Mao’s China or Kim’s North Korea come to mind. But where two or more political parties exist within a nation, debate and compromise often lead to an overall better effect for the majority, as exhibited in the past few centuries of diverse governments across Europe and in the US. Additionally, these systems innately allow for freedom of differing opinions, freedom of research, as well as freedom for national discourse.

Our genetics, workplaces, economics, and political systems thrive best with diversity, exactly as Nature would have it. In the socio-cultural context, we witness that the Law of Diversity muscles its way through any attempt to homogenize our world.

One of the most obvious examples of cultural homogeneity is the ubiquity of American fast food chains exported throughout the world. Yet even these are not cookie-cutter establishments, their menus are adjusted to the native culture of their location. From “shrimp nuggets” offered by KFC in Singapore, to a “black Ninja burger” from Burger King in Japan, to a “dried pork and seaweed” donut at Dunkin’ Donuts in China, the Law of Diversity is manifested despite the homogenization of branding. Where imported cultural staples are adopted, there still remains a force of Diversity; New York sushi restaurants adapt the Japanese food to their Kosher clientele; in South America, sushi is dipped in salsa rather than soy sauce.

I’ve observed that workplace homogenization in the form of uniforms has prompted some eccentric personal grooming habits or accessorizing as a way of creating diversity; it’s the reason the tattoo culture has bloomed the last two decades, or facial piercings, or funky hairstyles and coloring. The trend of socks or ties in outrageous colors and patterns buck against the boardroom homogeneity of dark suits, allowing for an expression of differentiation. It’s as if on a subconscious level, we’re finding ways to be diverse from one another despite global, corporate pressure to look homogeneous.

At our very base, cellular level, there exists Diversity, and we are healthier for it. It should come as no surprise then, that our social structures, bound by the same Natural Law, are healthier when Diversity is preferred over homogeneity. Though some of us still strive to create a homogeneous culture, with one religion and one political system and one dominate race, Nature’s Law of Diversity will see to it that it is not permanent.

Here’s to our differences, for they constitute creativity and robust societies.

In peace,

Frankie


Toppled

A man* once predicted (I paraphrase) “We’ll have to learn the manners of being third world citizens.”

“What a grand crazy idea!” I thought, (though secretly I knew we were certainly on the path to such a claim). That was just a few years ago and today I know with certainty that we’ve lost our stature.

Most recent, and most troubling, is an all call advisory to the world that we have a gun violence problem and maybe people should rethink their planned visit to the US, “avoid crowded places like…schools, places of worship, shopping malls.”

  • A nation that once attracted the tourists of the world is now considered an insecure geographical area.

We’re dying because our healthcare system is built upon uncompromising avarice. “One thousand percent increase!” on a patent I didn’t create, on a loophole they don’t close, on body counts that are out of sight, out of mind. (“Senator, did you hear about the couple that committed suicide because of health care bills?”    “Why no, I”ll have my staff look into it.”)

  • The wealthy do not care that people die as a direct result of their greed. They have theirs, fuck the rest.

Armed forces are raiding workplaces and holding up random citizens or sending them back to a country they never lived in where they die.  “Where are your papers?” “Where do you work?” “What is your nationality?” “What is your main language?”

  • Militant removal of ‘others’ for the sake of purity of a chosen few – a police state of racism replaces the open welcome of diversity.

National leadership demonstrates a complete disdain for norms and processes. Professionalism and duty towards country is now usurped by name calling and sycophantic treason. “I’m proud I held up a SCOTUS nominee.”  “I’ll raise the price of membership to my golf club.” “I’ll visit an enemy country on our national celebration of Independence.”

  • Elected officials casually dismiss our founding tenets for the sake of self-preservation and power.
  • Refuse to replace staff, defiantly hold off on appointing cabinet members, gradually bring together all power under one authoritarian voice.
  • Perpetual insecurity, filling the populace with fear so it’s willing to submit.
  • Resisters are ridiculed; facts and logic considered crazy.
  • Truth is subjective, propaganda becomes norm.
  • The fourth estate is defamed.
  • Wealth disparity grows daily.
  • We’re in a heap of debt.

We are a toppled nation..

 

*Chalmers Johnson, “Dismantling the Empire”

 

 

 

 

 

 


Dis En Franchised

I am being deprived of my privilege.

Everyone wants to be equal and have the same playing field.

But if that happens, then I am no longer on top, no longer number one.

I’d have no claim to being special.

I’d no longer belong to God’s chosen race. 

I’d be just like all the rest – just like all them homos, just like all them foreigners. 

I don’t know what that means; 

How would I know my place in society if everyone is equal?

I don’t know any other world than this one with its sense of imperiousness: 

That calm, wide undercurrent I’ve felt in everything I’ve been taught.

The idea that only my kind worshiped the right God. 

Only my kind is civilized. Only my social structure is allowed.

What future is there for me without that undercurrent?

I can’t envision it.

There is no one who will define it for me or show me how to act within it.

The uncertainty makes me anxious, fills me with fear.

A fear that decides to haunt me and grows exponentially

until one day it tips over into an empty vat and morphs into a deep anger

that I can no longer control – and maybe I don’t want to.

It feeds me, this anger.

It validates me and then becomes my best friend and adviser. 

I’ve learned there are others who embrace the same anger, welcome the same adviser.

I am thankful for my online brothers,

ours is a private world where we talk about keeping our privilege,

we talk about lording it over others who are not like us,

we say “fuck equality,” we’ll do things our way here.

We encourage one another, “This is our Vietnam,

we’ve got to rid our country of those who think they could ever be equal to us.”

We ask about the best guns to own, we discuss how to cause the most damage,

we feel no remorse at ending the life of someone

who dares to think they could ever be equal to us.

No one can ever be like us. 

We won’t lose our privilege to anyone beneath us.

We will not conform to a society where our kind must yield to their kind who smell funny and talk differently, yet want the same treatment.

Even our own President says they’re invading us, and there’s only one solution to an invasion:

Kill the fuckers. 

They can’t deny my privilege and render me disenfranchised if they’re all dead. 

 

Author’s note: Some come close to describing disenfranchisement as one of the main underlying problems to many of today’s mass shootings and the white supremacy movement, but they don’t really come out and say it. I wrote this little prose so that we might better understand part of the process of disenfranchisement and open up dialogue about ways to address this issue. 

 

 


Poisonous Choice

In every circumstance there is a choice, whether it’s personal or societal.

From a societal aspect, it seems many of our choices boil down to choosing either a punitive or compassionate approach to solutions that challenge our communities. In the US, we seem to take a punitive approach to most of our societal issues.

An examination of our overall response to homelessness exemplifies the point. Instead of looking beneath the surface of the problem to discover solutions, we vilify the homeless as lazy and moochers instead. We think they should just pull themselves up and get a job and realize the American Dream, but we don’t want to help them do it. We cry ‘socialism’ and ‘entitlement’ and ‘dependence,’ and blame them for their own undoing. As Maslow’s Hierarchy of needs demonstrates, when one is focused on merely surviving day to day, anything else takes second place. But we refuse to offer the one thing that will help them, a means to have a roof over their head. In some cities like mine, we kick it up a notch by forcing the homeless out of public spaces and booking them like criminals. A blatantly punitive, not compassionate approach that only exacerbates the situation.

Norway provides an example of a compassionate approach. It dropped its homeless rate by a third in four years simply by getting to the root of the problem and providing housing.

“This means that homelessness is understood as a housing problem, not primarily or solely as a social problem, and the provision of housing with or without follow-up is considered essential to prevent and reduce homelessness,” says researcher and project manager Evelyn Dyb at the NIBR City and Regional Research Institute at Oslo and Akershus University of Applied Sciences.

The US obviously takes a punitive approach to drug addiction as well. Instead of applying compassion and the understanding that we’re dealing with a disease, we criminalize drug abuse. It’s my personal contention that by taking this approach, we actually enable their thievery and other violence. We keep our prison industry alive with drug offenders, with almost half of its occupants convicted on drug related charges. (rarely do the drug companies or doctors who push the pills suffer any consequences).

The nation of Portugal decided to approach drug addiction from a compassionate angle with robust positive results. But their society first made a conscious effort to adjust their perspectives:

Portugal’s remarkable recovery, and the fact that it has held steady through several changes in government – including conservative leaders who would have preferred to return to the US-style war on drugs – could not have happened without an enormous cultural shift, and a change in how the country viewed drugs, addiction – and itself. 

As a last example, I’ll utilize the current US border issue and the choice this administration is making by acting punitively instead of compassionately. Prior to the Zero tolerance policy, and at the behest of the Obama administration, migrants were released to relatives with ankle monitors to ensure their accountability to appear to court cases, etc.. There were social workers and agents involved to act as liaisons to help them through that process. Our nation does not act compassionately in this regard any longer.

Detention centers have morphed into concentration camps as they’ve become overcrowded and unsanitary due to defying the Flores Settlement as well as scrapping the prior administration’s more compassionate program of release with the ability to monitor.

I’ve observed a couple of compelling reasons behind the US’ consistent punitive approach to most social issues. The first is hard to miss: greed. The private prison industry takes millions in taxpayer money every year to house non violent drug criminals. GEO and CoreCivic are currently earning a whopping $775 a day to house migrants instead of releasing them to relatives. Drug manufacturers have raked in billions thanks to Oxycontin. Quite a few people became much wealthier by creating the housing bubble, which helped create the homeless crisis.

From another stance, there’s a healthy contingency in our midst that infuses a religious flavor to the idea of punity, choosing to draw from the notion of an authoritarian god instead of the example of a compassionate savior.

In each example, the compassionate approach is more humane and overall healthier for the society who employs it. The punitive approach only seems to poison a nation by reinforcing greed and authoritarianism. Would that the US could have a paradigm shift along the lines of Portugal and Jesus’ teachings.

In Peace,

Frankie


The Laws of Dichotomy and Balance

Installment 1 of 21st Century Treatise.


Nature is always, tirelessly, constantly, and ceaselessly striving for balance because it is comprised of endless pairs of opposites:  matter/anti- matter, light/dark, positive/negative, on/off, high/low, male/female, animus/anima, ad infinitum.

There are two kinds of balance at work in Nature. We might immediately think of the scale kind of balance model, as in the ‘scales of justice’, similar to a teeter totter. A scale balance is an either/or situation: the energy on one side significantly outweighs the energy of other side, and we get a lopsided situation; or the energy is of equal weight on either side and balances perfectly. There’s no middle ground with the scale model of balance.

There is also a bell curve model of balance, where two extremes or opposites exist but the majority of the energy falls in the middle, creating a ‘bell shape.’ This inherently makes for a flexible, more stable kind of balance. The energy can shift slightly to one side or the other, but the system will remain viable and functioning. Since the dynamics of the bell curve balance place most of the energy in the middle of the spectrum, we can therefore perceive balance of this kind as belonging in the ‘middle.’ (Interestingly, our language is teeming with references to this ‘middle’ balance kind of model. We use the term ‘middle ground’ to indicate compromise, balancing opposite opinions if you will, and moving forward.  The term ‘middle class’ defines the bulk of a nation’s economic, social, and labor energy. The wisdom of the Buddhist concept of ‘The Middle Way’ encourages moderation instead of the extremes of asceticism or self-indulgence.)

Examples of both models of balance abound in Nature.

On a scale model of balance, we know there had to be just the right amount of gravitational balance on our planet in order for Life to have developed; if it were slightly more or slightly less, Life could not have formed. Atoms possess the dichotomy of positively and negatively charged protons and electrons. This dichotomy allows them to bond together to form molecules as their charges attract to each other to achieve balance. The wind that tousles our hair is the direct result of a low pressure system and a high pressure system meeting and striving to achieve atmospheric balance.

An example of a bell curve model of balance can be seen in the age distribution of any animal group, there are a few youngsters and a few oldsters (technically termed outliers), but the majority of the group is middle age.  If the energy of the system shifts too far one way or the other, let’s say there becomes an abnormally high elderly population, then we begin to see problems within the working model. In Japan, for instance, the growing elderly population is affecting the development of robotics. Since there are fewer caretakers than elderly, life size robots are being used as a substitute. In the US, the retiring Baby Boomer generation is leaving an imbalance in job fields such as engineering and electrical specialists since there aren’t enough younger people trained in these areas. It is also straining our Social Security and public retirement systems, which means funds to keep roads maintained or hire more staff for forest upkeep or open another sheriff’s position are compromised. Our current resources, both monetary and labor, are scarce due to an imbalance in retired citizens.

Nature is obsessed with balancing the millions of dichotomies inherent in its makeup.  We humans are as subject to this peculiarity as every other part of the Universe, in fact it is ingrained within our very cellular structure. The membranes of our cells are careful ‘gatekeepers,’ allowing only a certain amount of fluid in or out to maintain homeostasis – balance. If Nature’s Law of Balance matters at microscopic levels, then it’s not much of a leap to understand that even the things we create: our institutions, our social frameworks, our cultural elements, and even our personal lives – are subject to the same Natural Law. When an imbalance occurs, whether from a germ that causes a fever in an individual, or greed that has caused a nation’s economy to become imbalanced, Nature will ensure that it is resolved to a balanced system. That’s Her thing.

It’s not always a smooth process to achieve balance. High/Low pressure systems can produce some nasty, damaging storms. Social balance is difficult to attain if one group refuses to give up control or privilege, as seen during the Civil Rights movement. An economic imbalance places undue, extreme hardship on a country’s citizens who eventually push back against the policies that created the imbalance, as in the storming of the Bastille. Here’s the glitch about achieving balance: the process is often violent. As severe weather storms can sometimes incur human casualties, often the restoration of social/political/economic balance comes at the cost of human life as well.

Balance is one of the most obvious Laws of Nature for us to observe, but we often miss the principle that our social constructs are as subject to this dynamic as any other. Take a moment today after reading a news article to reflect on the influence of this important Law. Does the article relate to some nuanced issue of balance? Consider the many situations the Law of Balance affects our lives. Don’t we strive to balance our work / home lives each day? Finally, understand that we can make good decisions based on the actions of this Law, both personally and nationally.

Thank you for reading. If you’d like to read more on the subject, this article on Diversity might be of interest.

Peace,

Frankie


21st Century Treatise, Introduction

Nature will not let us fret and fume. She does not like our benevolence or our learning much better than she likes our frauds and wars. When we come out of the caucus, or the bank, or the abolition convention, or the temperance-meeting, or the transcendental club, into the fields and woods, she says to us, ‘so hot? my little Sir.’”

Ralph Waldo Emerson, “Spiritual Laws,” Essays, First Series (1841, repr. 1847).

We humans have achieved some pretty amazing things since the agricultural revolution some twelve thousand years ago. Once we learned to manipulate Nature in various ways to suit our needs, we catapulted our species to soaring heights. Our clever inventions allow us to lead a very charmed life today compared to our ancestors.  We work in carefully controlled indoor climates, we live longer, and we are more aware than ever of our natural surroundings and how they function.  We understand the universe in ways incomprehensible to Copernicus and we understand our bodies in ways unfathomable to da Vinci. We don’t need to hunt any longer for our daily food and we don’t even need to have sex to pass on our genetics. We’ve been to the moon, we’ve put a tread mark on Mars, and some of us actually live in space. We homo sapiens have come a long, long way indeed.

While we bask in our achievements and enjoy their conveniences, there is cause for worry. As we’ve progressed from cave-dwellers to space station tenants, a great disconnect occurred between Mother Nature and her bi-pedal children because we are no longer as intimate with her workings as we once were. It seems a logical by-product of our advanced civilization: we live and work mainly indoors and get our food from cans and bottles and jars. Our experiences with Nature are confined to camping trips, gardening, and domesticated canines and felines. Limiting our interaction with Mother Nature, and becoming independent from her, means that we have lost touch with her. We fail to remember – and recognize – that we are as subject Nature’s Laws as the rest of the universe. In fact, even our social structures and the civilizations we build from them are governed by Nature’s Law’s – “So hot? my little Sir.”

Twenty-first Century Treatise explores the affect of Nature’s Laws on our social structures and civilizations in order to discover some very important lessons about ourselves and how our societies work. We learn how Nature’s Laws effect our personal lives. We learn that Nature’s Laws apply to our social frameworks and we can make pragmatic decisions using those Laws to develop policies that sustain healthy societies. We learn that it is possible to make conscious, long term, positive political decisions through the lens of Nature’s Laws. We learn that certain areas of each nation must be balanced in order to be healthy and growing; and that we can control those areas with effective legislation. We realize why it’s important to be diplomatic with our international neighbors.

It is my hope that this Treatise will provide some tools for positive decision making as we continue to grow and move forward together. We are an amazing creature, but we cannot forget that we are, and will always be, subject to Nature’s Laws, and so are the civilizations we build around us. “So hot, my little sir?”

Frankie

Read the next installment of 21st Century Treatise: The Laws of Dichotomy and Balance


God Given Freedom

You fashion laws into a millstone of false piety,

secure it around the body with a rope of self righteousness,

and sling it over a tree of disinformation –

killing those whose liberty you vanquish

in the name of life and consciousness.

But even God himself wisely allows us the freedom to choose.

 

You abusively decide for me what happens to my body,

when you cannot even conceive of the costs incurred

by it to bring a life into the world.

You follow a selfish mandate and rob

half your society of their autonomy.

Even God himself generously allows us the autonomy to choose.

 

With arrogant privilege you enslave

the very beings who brought you forth and nurtured you.

With outright insolence you seize authority

over a million bodies that are not yours,

over thousands of circumstances you cannot possibly predict,

over the inner sanctum of the holy moment of birth

where you do not belong.

Even God himself humbly allows us the grace to choose.

 

He said naught all those years we suffocated newborns

or left them out for the wolves because

just as he ordained throughout creation,

He keenly understood that all mothers had the right

to decide which child to feed.

He kept silent when a mother and her midwife

quietly comforted a dying newborn whose deformities

would be a burden to society:

A passionate Creator knows that quality matters more than quantity.

 

He specifically intuits that humans should be free to choose;

he even gave us the ultimate freedom to choose him.

So you who can not perceive of the mystery of life in the slightest,

keep your hands off my freedom,

keep your laws off my body.

You have not been ordained to surpass

the one you confess as Savior

whose own father allows us the freedom to choose.